Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

List of thumbnails

< >
61
61 (49)
62
62 (50)
63
63 (51)
64
64 (52)
65
65 (53)
66
66 (54)
67
67 (55)
68
68 (56)
69
69 (57)
70
70 (58)
< >
page |< < (56) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
    <echo version="1.0RC">
      <text xml:lang="en" type="free">
        <div type="section" level="1" n="34">
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="56" file="0068" n="68" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            the name of Volva à volvendo, becauſe it does
              <lb/>
            by reaſon of its Diurnal Revolution appear
              <lb/>
            unto them conſtantly to turn round, and there-
              <lb/>
            fore he ſtyles thoſe who live in that Hemi-
              <lb/>
            ſphere which is towards us, by the Title of
              <lb/>
            Subvolvani, becauſe they enjoy the ſight of
              <lb/>
            this Earth; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and the others Privolvani, quia
              <lb/>
            ſunt privati conſpectu volvæ, becauſe they
              <lb/>
            are depriv’d oſ this priviledge. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But Fulius
              <lb/>
            Cæſar, whom I have above Quoted, ſpea-
              <lb/>
            king oſ their Teſtimony whom I cite for this
              <lb/>
            Opinion, viz. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Keplar and Galilæus, Aſſirms
              <lb/>
            that to his Knowledge they did but jeſt in thoſe
              <lb/>
            things which they Write concerning this, and
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0068-01a" xlink:href="note-0068-01"/>
            as for any ſuch World, he aſſuredly knows
              <lb/>
            they never ſo much as dreamt oſ it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But I had
              <lb/>
            rather believe their own Words, than his pre-
              <lb/>
            tended Knowledge.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="5">
            <note symbol="a" position="right" xlink:label="note-0067-05" xlink:href="note-0067-05a" xml:space="preserve">In Theſi.
              <lb/>
            bus.</note>
            <note symbol="b" position="right" xlink:label="note-0067-06" xlink:href="note-0067-06a" xml:space="preserve">Diſſerta-
              <lb/>
            tio cum
              <lb/>
            Nunc.</note>
            <note symbol="c" position="right" xlink:label="note-0067-07" xlink:href="note-0067-07a" xml:space="preserve">Nuncius
              <lb/>
            Syderius.</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0067-08" xlink:href="note-0067-08a" xml:space="preserve">Somn. Aſtr.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0068-01" xlink:href="note-0068-01a" xml:space="preserve">De phæ-
              <lb/>
            nom. Lunæ.
              <lb/>
            6. 4.</note>
          </div>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis true indeed, in ſome things they do but
              <lb/>
            triſle, but for the main Scope oſ thoſe Diſ-
              <lb/>
            courſes, ’tis as manifeſtly they ſeriouſly meant
              <lb/>
            it, as any indifferent Reader may eaſily diſ-
              <lb/>
            cern; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">As for Galilæus, ’tis evident he did ſet
              <lb/>
            down his own Judgement and Opinion in theſe
              <lb/>
            things; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">otherwiſe, ſure Campanella ( a Man
              <lb/>
            as well acquainted with his Opinion, and per-
              <lb/>
            haps his Perſon, as Cæſar was) would never
              <lb/>
            have writ an Apology for him. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And beſides,
              <lb/>
            ’tis very likely iſ it had beeen but a Jeſt, Ga-
              <lb/>
            lilæus would never have ſuffer’d ſo much for it,
              <lb/>
            as Report ſaith, afterwards he did.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And as for Keplar, I will only refer the
              <lb/>
            Reader to his own words as they are ſet down
              <lb/>
            in the Preface to the Fourth Book oſ his Epi-
              <lb/>
            tome, where his purpoſe is to make an Apolo-</s>
          </p>
        </div>
      </text>
    </echo>