Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Page concordance

< >
Scan Original
91 79
92 80
93 81
94 82
95 83
96 84
97 85
98 86
99 87
100 88
101 89
102 90
103 91
104 92
105 93
106 94
107 95
108 96
109 97
110 98
111 99
112 100
113 101
114 102
115 103
116 104
117 105
118 106
119 107
120 108
< >
page |< < (88) of 370 > >|
That the Moon may be a World.
Whereas ’tis the common Opinion, and found
true enough by Obſervation, that Olympus,
Atlas, Taurus and Emus, with many others, are
much above this height.
Tenariffa in the
Canary Iſlands, is commonly related to be
above 8 Miles Perpendicular, and about this
height (ſay ſome) is the Mount Perjacaca in
America.
Sir Walter Rawleigh ſeems to think,Hiſt. l.1.c.
7. Sect. 11.
Meteor. l.
I. c. II.
that the higheſt of theſe is near 30 Miles up-
right.
nay, Ariſtotle ſpeaking of Gaucaſus in
Aſia, affirins it to be Viſible for 560 Miles, as
ſome Interpreters find by Computation;
from
which it will follow, that it was 78 Miles Per-
pendicularly high, as you may ſee confirm'd by
Facobus Mazonius, and out of him in Blancanus
Comparatio
Ariſt. cum.
Platone.
Sect 3.c.5.
Expoſt. in
loc Math.
Arlis loc.
148.
the Jeſuit.
But this Deviates from the truth,
more in Exceſs, than the other doth in defect.
However, though theſe in the Moon are
not ſo high asſome amongſt us;
yet certain
it is they are of a great height, and ſome of

Text layer

  • Dictionary

Text normalization

  • Original

Search


  • Exact
  • All forms
  • Fulltext index
  • Morphological index