Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[21. The Firſt Book. That the MOON May be a WORLD. The Firſt Propoſition, by way of Preface.]
[22. Sed vanus ſtolidis hæc omnia finxerit Error.]
[23. Solis lunæq; labores.]
[24. Cum fruſtra reſonant æra auxiliaria Lunæ.]
[25. Una laboranti poterit ſuccerrere Lunæ.]
[26. Gantus & è cælo poſſunt deducere Lunam.]
[27. Cantus & ſi curru lunam deducere tentant, Et facerent, ſi non æra repulſa ſonant.]
[28. PROP. II. That a Plurality of Worlds doth not contradict any Principle of Reaſon or Faith.]
[29. Æſtuas infelix auguſto limite mundi.]
[30. PROP. III. That the Heavens do not conſiſt of any ſuch pure Matter, which can priviledge them from the like Change and Corruption, as theſe Inferiour, Bodies are liable unto.]
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">
              <pb o="7" file="0019" n="19" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            ſhould have Trave@ed thither alſo, if there had
              <lb/>
            been any Inhabitants; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">eſpecially ſince he did ex-
              <lb/>
            preſly command them to go & </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Teach all Nations,
              <lb/>
            and Preach the Goſpel through the whole World,
              <lb/>
            and therefore he thinks, that as there are no
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0019-01a" xlink:href="note-0019-01"/>
            Men, ſo neither are there Seas, or Rivers, or any
              <lb/>
            other conveniency for Habitation. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">’Tis com-
              <lb/>
            monly related of one Virgliius, that he was Ex-
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0019-02a" xlink:href="note-0019-02"/>
            communicated and Condemned for a Heretick
              <lb/>
            by Zachary Biſhop of Rome, becauſe he was
              <lb/>
            not of the ſame Opinion. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But Baronius ſays,
              <lb/>
            becauſe he thought there was another habita-
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0019-03a" xlink:href="note-0019-03"/>
            ble World within ours. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">However, you may
              <lb/>
            well enough diſcern in theſe examples, how
              <lb/>
            confident many of theſe great Scholars were
              <lb/>
            in ſo groſs an Error, how unlikely, what in-
              <lb/>
            credible thing it ſeemed to them, that there
              <lb/>
            ſhould be any Antipodes: </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">and yet now this
              <lb/>
            Truth is as certain and plain, as Senſe or De-
              <lb/>
            monſtration can make it. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">This then which I
              <lb/>
            now deliver, is not to be rejected, though it
              <lb/>
            may ſeem to contradict the common Opinion.</s>
            <s xml:space="preserve"/>
          </p>
          <div type="float" level="2" n="1">
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0018-03" xlink:href="note-0018-03a" xml:space="preserve">Coment. in
              <lb/>
            1. Cap. Gen.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0018-04" xlink:href="note-0018-04a" xml:space="preserve">Pſal. 24. 2.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0018-05" xlink:href="note-0018-05a" xml:space="preserve">Comment, in
              <lb/>
            1. Geniſ.</note>
            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0018-06" xlink:href="note-0018-06a" xml:space="preserve">1 Tim. 2. 4.</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0019-01" xlink:href="note-0019-01a" xml:space="preserve">Mat. 28. 16.</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0019-02" xlink:href="note-0019-02a" xml:space="preserve">Aventinus
              <lb/>
            Annal Boi-
              <lb/>
            orum lib. 3</note>
            <note position="right" xlink:label="note-0019-03" xlink:href="note-0019-03a" xml:space="preserve">Annal Ec-
              <lb/>
            cleſ. A. D.
              <lb/>
            748.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">2. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Groſs abſurdities have been entertained
              <lb/>
            by general conſent. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I might Inſtance in many
              <lb/>
            remarkable examples, but I will only ſpeak
              <lb/>
            of the ſuppoſed Labour of the Moon in her
              <lb/>
            Eclipſes, becauſe this is neareſt to the chieſ
              <lb/>
            matter in hand, and was received as a common
              <lb/>
            Opinion amongſt many of the Antients, inſo-
              <lb/>
            much that from hence they ſtiled the Eclipſes
              <lb/>
            by the name of πὰθη Paſſions, or in the Phraſe
              <lb/>
            of the Poets</s>
          </p>
        </div>
        <div type="section" level="1" n="23">
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">Solis lunæq; labores.</head>
          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">And therefore Plutarch ſpeaking of a Lunary</s>
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