Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
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              <pb o="68" file="0080" n="80" rhead="That the Moon may be a World."/>
            confuſed Figure, and doth not repreſent any
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            diſtinct Image, ſo that both in reſpect of the
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            matter, and the Form, it may be probable e-
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            nough, that thoſe ſpots and brighter parts may
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            ſhew the diſtinction betwixt the Sea and Land
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            in that other World.</s>
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          <head xml:space="preserve">PROP. VIII.</head>
          <head style="it" xml:space="preserve">The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts
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          the Land.</head>
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            <s xml:space="preserve">WHen I firſt compar'd the Nature of our
              <lb/>
            Earth and Water, with thoſe appearan-
              <lb/>
            ces in the Moon; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">I concluded contrary to the
              <lb/>
            Propoſition, that the brighter Parts repreſented
              <lb/>
            the Water, and the Spots the Land; </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">of this
              <lb/>
            Opinion likewiſe was Keplar at the firſt. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">But
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            my ſecond Thoughts, and the reading of others,
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              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0080-01a" xlink:href="note-0080-01"/>
            have now convinced me (as after he was) of
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            the Truth of that Propoſition which I have
              <lb/>
            now ſet down. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Before I come to the Confir-
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            mation of it, I ſhall mention thoſe Scruples,
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            which at firſt made me doubt the Truth of this
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            Opinion.</s>
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            <note position="left" xlink:label="note-0080-01" xlink:href="note-0080-01a" xml:space="preserve">Opt. Aſtro.
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            c. 6. num. 9.
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            Diſſert.
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            cum nuncio
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            Gal.</note>
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          <p>
            <s xml:space="preserve">1. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">It may be Objected, ’tis Probable, if there
              <lb/>
            be any ſuch Sea and Land as ours, that it bears
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            ſome Proportion and Similitude with ours, but
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            now this Propoſition takes away all Likeneſs
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            betwixt them. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">For whereas the Superficies of
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            our Earth is but the Third part of the whole
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            Surface in the Globe. </s>
            <s xml:space="preserve">Two Parts being over-
              <lb/>
              <anchor type="note" xlink:label="note-0080-02a" xlink:href="note-0080-02"/>
            ſpread with the Water (as Scaliger Obſerves)
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            yet here, according to this Opinion, the Sea
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            ſhould be leſs than the Land, ſince there is not</s>
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