Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

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[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
[61. PROP. VII. Tis probable that the Sun is in the Gentre of the World.]
[62. PROP. VIII. That there is not any ſufficient reaſon to prove the Earth incapable of thoſe mo-tions which Copernicus aſcribes un-to it.]
[63. Provebimur portu, terræque, verbeſq; recedunt.]
[64. PROP. IX. That it is more probable the Earth does move, than the Sun or Heavens.]
[65. PROP. X. That this Hypotheſis is exactly agreeable to common appearances.]
[66. Quicunq; ſolam mente præcipiti petit]
[67. Brevem replere non valentis ambitum, # Pudebit aucti nominis.]
[68. FINIS.]
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That the Moon may be a World.
1. That a new Truth may ſeem abſurd and
impoſſible, not only to the Vulgar, but to
thoſe alſo who are otherwiſe Wiſe Men and
excellent Schollars;
and hence it will follow,
that every new thing which ſeems to oppoſe
common Principles, is not preſently to be re-
jected, but rather to be pry'd into by a dili-
gent enquiry, ſince there are many things which
are yet hid from us, and reſerv’d for future
Diſcovery.
2. That it is not the commonneſs of an Opi-
nion that can priviledge it for a Truth;
the
wrong way is ſometime a well beaten Path,
whereas the right way (eſpecially to hidden
Truths) may be leſs trodden, and more ob-
ſcure.
True indeed, the ſtrangeneſs of this Opi-
nion will detract much from its Credit;
but
yet we ſhould know that nothing is in it ſelf
ſtrange, ſince every Natural Effect has an equal
dependance upon its Cauſe, and with the like
neceſſity doth follow from it;
ſo that ’tis our
Ignorance which makes things appear ſo;
and
hence it comes to paſs, that many more Evi-
dent Truths ſeem incredible to ſuch who know
not the cauſes of things:
you may as ſoon
perſwade ſome Country Peaſants, that the
Moon is made of Green-Cheeſe (as we ſay)
as that ’tis bigger than his Cart-Wheel, ſince
both ſeem equally to contradict his ſight, and
he has not reaſon enough to lead him far-
ther than his Senſes.
Nay, ſuppoſe (ſaith Plu-
tarch) a Philoſopher ſhould be Educated in
ſuch a ſecret place, where he might not ſee
either Sea or River, and afterwards ſhould be

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