Wilkins, John, A discovery of a new world : or a discourse tending to prove, that 'tis probable there may be another Habitable World in the Moon ; with a discourse concerning the Probability of a Passage thither; unto which is added, a discourse concerning a New Planet, tending to prove, that 'tis probable our earth is one of the Planets

Table of contents

< >
[31. Necnon Oceano paſci phæbumque polumq; Gredimus.]
[32. PROP. IV. That the Moon is a Solid, Compacted, Opacous Body.]
[33. PROP. V. That the Moon hath not any Light of her own.]
[34. PROP. VI. That there is a World in the Moon, bath been the direct Opinion of many Ancient, with ſome Modern Mathematicians, and may probably de deduc’d from the Tenents of others.]
[35. PROP. VII. That thoſe Spots and brighter parts, which by our ſight may be diſtinguiſhed in the Moon, do ſhew the difference betwixt the Sea and Land, in that other World.]
[36. PROP. VIII. The Spots repeſent the Sea, and the brighter parts the Land.]
[37. PROP. IX. That there are high Mountains, deep Vallies, and ſpacious Plains in the Body of the Moon.]
[38. PROP. X. That there is an Atmo-ſphæra, or an Orb of groſs, Vaporous Air, immediately encompaſſing the body of the Moon.]
[39. PROP. XI. That as their World is our Moon, ſo our World is their Moon.]
[40. Provehimur portu, terræque urbeſque recedunt.]
[41. PROP. XII.]
[42. PROP. XIII.]
[43. PROP. XIV.]
[44. FINIS.]
[45. A DISCOURSE Concerning a Rem Planet. Tending to prove That ’tis probable our EARTH is one of the PLANETS. The Second Book. By John Wilkins, late L. Biſhop of Cheſter.]
[46. LONDON: Printed by J. D. for John Gellibrand, at the Golden Ball in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. M.DC.LXXXIV.]
[47. To the Reader.]
[48. PROP. I.]
[49. PROP. II.]
[50. PROP. III.]
[51. PROP. IV.]
[52. PROP. V.]
[53. PROP. VI.]
[54. PROP. VII. PROP. VIII. PROP. IX. PROP. X.]
[55. That the EARTH May be a PLANET. PROP. I.]
[56. PROP. II.]
[57. PROP. III.]
[58. PROP. IV.]
[59. PROP. V. That the Scripture, in its proper conſtru-ction, does not any where affirm the Immobility of the Earth.]
[60. PROP. VI. That there is not any Argument from the Words of Scripture, Principles of Na-ture, or Obſervations in Aſtronomy, which can ſuſſiciently evidence the Earth to be in the Gentre of the Uni-verſe.]
< >
page |< < (56) of 370 > >|
That the Earth may be a Planet.
derſtood only in relation to outward ap-
pearances, and vulgar opinion.

PROP. IV.

That divers learned Men have fallen into
# great Abſurdities, whilſt they have
# looked for the Grounds of Philoſophy
# from the words of Scripture.
IT has been an ancient and common opi-
nion amongſt the Jews, that the Law of
Moſes did contain in it, not only thoſe things
which concern our Religion and Obedience,
but every Secret alſo that may poſſibly be
known in any Art or Science;
ſo that there
Schickard,
Bechin.
Hapern.
Diſp. 5.
num. 8.
is not a Demonſtration in Geometry, or
Rule in Arithmetick;
not a Myſtery in any
Trade, but it may be found out in the
Pentatcuch.
Hence it was (ſay they) that
Solomon had all his Wiſdom and Policy:
Hence it was that he did fetch his Knowledg
concerning the nature of Vegetables, from
the Cedar of Lebanon to the Hyſop that
grows upon the Wall.
Nay, from hence,
they thought a Man might learn the Art of
Miracles, to removea Mountain, or recover
the dead.
So ſtrangely have the learneder
ſort of that Nation been befooled, ſince their
own Curſe hath lighted upon them.

Text layer

  • Dictionary

Text normalization

  • Original

Search


  • Exact
  • All forms
  • Fulltext index
  • Morphological index